George Griffith piano tuning in Melbourne, 1876

July to Sep 1876

PIANOFORTE TUNING.
TUNING. TUNING.
NICHOLSON and ASCHERBERG

Beg to inform their musical friends and the public
that they have now in their employ the
THREE BEST TUNERS IN MELBOURNE,
The staff consisting
Of
Mr. JOHN BLACKBURN,
Of whom nothing need be said, his name being a suffi-
cient guarantee for excellence of work.
Mr. RICHARD O'BRIEN,
A most excellent and finished tuner, for five years with Erard,
several years with Broadwood, for the
last five years constantly engaged in Melbourne.
Mr. GEO. GRIFFITH,
A most careful and painstaking tuner.
In securing the very best men for this important branch of their
business, Nicholson and Ascherberg again prove that it is
their endeavour to have the best that can be had in every
department, and they hope that this will be duly estimated by
their numerous
friends and the public
The tuning of a piano is one of the main things to be thought
of by owners, as many a good instrument is spoiled by the
tuning being entrusted to inferior men.
Nicholson and Ascherberg therefore assure the public that
all tuning entrusted to them will receive every justice at their hands,
combined with punctuality and moderate charge.
NICHOLSON and ASCHERBERG,
Pianoforte Gallery
(Opposite W. H. Rocke and Co ),
46 and 47 COLLINS-STREET EAST.
The Argus 3 June 1876




A few months later Nicholson and Ascherberg advertised a string and brass orchestra.  It is tempting to think that George was a part of that orchestra.  Perhaps he was, but the only story about him that I have heard that has been handed down was that he suffered from rheumatoid arthritis in his  hands, and that he had to have his hands massaged before he could play.  I have wondered whether he was still able to play. 

NICHOLSON and ASCHERBERG'S BAND 
(String and Brass Instruments) 
has long been known as the first orchestra for
dance music in the colony.
The BAND Consists of 80 MEN.
Conducted by the well-known Herr PLOCK,
possessing the largest and most choice repertoire
of music of any band this side of the equator.  
Any number from one to 80 can be engaged. 
Engagements may be made and all particulars ob-
tained at Nicholson and Ascherberg's. 
Quadrille pianist, Herr Plock.



PIANOFORTE TUNING,
NIOHOLSON and ASCHERBERG,

Have in their employ the   
FOUR BEST TUNERS in the COLONY,
The staff consisting of   
Mr. JOHN BLACKBURN    
Mr. RICHARD O'BRIEN.
Mr. J. EZOLD.
Mr. GEO. GRIFFITH.
In the tuning of pianos many a good instrument is
spoiled by the work being entrusted to inferior work-
men, Messrs. N. and A. assure the public that all
orders given them will be faithfully executed with
punctuality, and at moderate charges.
NICHOLSON and ASCHERBERG,  
45 and 47 COLLINS-STREET
The Argus 9 September 1876

After this date Nicholson and Ascherberg continued to advertise the best piano tuners in Melbourne, but they no longer advertised their names, concentrating on different aspects of their music business on which to spend their advertising pounds.

Comments

  1. I love your new blog. I had a great uncle who went to New Zealand and Australia for gold rushes, and returned to Boston with lots of stories. I'll be reading your stories often!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hi Heather,

    Thanks for your kinds words. I only wish George had actually left us with his own stories- in a letter, or a journal, perhaps. Too easy! I have discovered how interesting the newspapers of the day are - just the advertisements tell interesting stories. I saw on which talked about a Hokitika hotel being just across the road from the camp - the miners' camp I assume. It did make it all seem like a rather bustling and cheery place (though cold - I notice how thick the woollen suits of the unknown gentleman are).

    Best wishes,

    Lenore

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment